What do your favorite James Webb photos say about you?

From the cosmic descents of the Carina Nebula to the Pillars of Creation and a fiery protostar, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has released a gallery of cosmic images in 2022 — but your favorite ones could reveal who you are.

The telescope’s official Twitter account shared a file Loudspeaker Friday with a personality test that asks users to choose their favorite photos from three groups of four.

Then NASA presents the attributes associated with the options.

Depending on the images chosen, you could be a time traveler, an astronomer, a homebody, or a trendsetter.

According to NASA, time travelers can seem outdated, stargazers are constantly growing and changing, household objects stick to routine, and trend-setters get ahead of the curve.

The first set of challenge images for NASA includes (a) Webb’s first deep field; (b) Cosmic slopes of the Carina Nebula. (c) Jupiter; and (d) Webb data showing the presence of water in the atmosphere of exoplanet WASP-96b

It’s been more than a year since NASA’s $10 billion telescope was launched into space – and since then it has returned stunning images of the universe in unprecedented detail.

Webb was launched from the Guyana Space Center on Christmas Day 2021 to travel back in time to the dawn of the universe, so that he could capture what happened a few hundred million years later, the Big Bang.

The first set of challenge images for NASA includes (a) Webb’s first deep field; (b) Cosmic slopes of the Carina Nebula. (c) Jupiter; and (d) Webb data showing the presence of water in the atmosphere of exoplanet WASP-96b.

The second set of pictures shows (A) Stephan’s Quintet; (B) Pillars of Creation in near-infrared light. (c) Neptune’s rings and moons; and (d) the first clear evidence of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of an exoplanet.

The final group includes (a) the cartwheel galaxy. (b) the L1527 cloud and a hidden protostar; (c) Titan, a moon of Saturn. and (D) Webb’s first direct image of an exoplanet, HIP 65426 b.

All of these images are never-before-seen glimpses of cosmic wonder.

This is thanks to the Near Infrared (NIRCam) Webcam and Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), which sees light in the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

These techniques capture never-before-seen properties and allow the telescope to travel back in time to hundreds of thousands of years after the Big Bang.

And while the world is in awe of the images, NASA believes they say a lot about a person’s personality.

For those who picked the majority of A’s in the three groups, the US space agency considers you a time traveler.

The words used to describe this one are messy, nostalgic, and old-fashioned hipster.

The tweet reads: “Just as looking at galaxies allows us to see billions of years into the past, your technique travels through time. You may like the old look. And thrive in chaos, like intergalactic mergers.”

If most of your favorite Webb pictures are B-pictures, you’re a dreaming astronomer, and the star of the show, who continues to understand.

Your head may be in the clouds. Just as nebulae often contain stars in the early stages of development, you are always growing and changing. Believe in yourself – you bring light into the universe. Keep shining,” NASA shared in the Twitter thread.

And for Cs, consider yourself a home person.

The second set of pictures shows (A) Stephan’s Quintet; (B) Pillars of Creation in near-infrared light. (c) Neptune’s rings and moons; and (d) the first clear evidence of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of an exoplanet.

The final group includes (a) the cartwheel galaxy. (b) the L1527 cloud and a hidden protostar; (c) Titan, a moon of Saturn. and (d) the first direct image of an exoplanet by Webb, HIP 65426b

“Just as looking at galaxies allows us to see billions of years into the past, your technique goes back in time. Maybe you like the old look. and thrive in chaos, like intergalactic mergers,” NASA shared in a tweet

The words used to describe this group are introverted, thick-shelled, and someone who loves comfort and routine.

“As an introvert, you prefer your own orbit. Rest and routine suit you well. Like Titan, it can have a thick atmosphere. But if someone is in your orbit, they will see your hidden charm,” according to the tweet.

The last group, the D’s, is for trendsetters who are ahead of the curve, mysterious and would rather text than call someone.

Always being ahead of the (crossing) curve and planning your next move, it may seem a long way off at first. Just like the way we discover exoplanets indirectly, you might prefer text over a call. You keep us exciting,” NASA shared.

Your head may be in the clouds. Just as nebulae often contain stars in the early stages of development, you are always growing and changing. Believe in yourself – you bring light into the universe. Keep shining,” NASA shared in the Twitter thread.

A fun quiz is a great way to end the year that marks the beginning of Webb’s epic quest.

Scientists predicted that the telescope, which now orbits the sun a million miles from Earth, should last 20 years.

“The tools are more efficient, and the optics are sharper and more stable. “We have more fuel and we use less fuel,” said Massimo Steavelli, chief of the Webb mission office at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore.

The orbiting infrared observatory is designed to be about 100 times more powerful than its predecessor, the Hubble Space Telescope.

NASA likes to think of James Webb as Hubble’s successor rather than a replacement, as the two will be working together for some time.

“As an introvert, you prefer your own orbit. Rest and routine suit you well. Like Titan, you can enjoy a thick atmosphere. But if someone is in your orbit, they will see your hidden charm,” according to the tweet

Always being ahead of the (crossing) curve and planning your next move, it may seem a long way off at first. Just like the way we discover exoplanets indirectly, you might prefer text over a call. You keep us exciting,” NASA shared

The JWST project, which began in 1996, is an international collaboration led by NASA in partnership with European and Canadian space agencies.

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